So, you’ve either filed a claim or been served with one, and you’re now informed your matter has been set down for ‘court mention’, sometimes referred to as a ‘directions hearing’. Excellent, the ball towards justice being served is rolling, your suit is dry cleaned and ready to go, and you’ve diarised the court date and time.

But what is a mention, and how do you prepare for one?

Directions Hearing in Court

A court mention is an appearance before the court to assist in the progression of a matter after initiating process has been served on the other party. The main purpose of a directions hearing is to set in place a Court timetable for the furtherance of the matter, be it the filing of a defence, exchange of evidence, dealing with interlocutory or preliminary issues such as requests for further and better particulars, or requests to move the matter to another Court.

Case Preparation

If your matter has been set down for a motion, there is a little bit of homework you should do (beyond picking the suit up from the dry cleaners!)

  1. Know your case – you should be able to give a quick, 30 second summary of the nature of the dispute and legal issues pleaded;
  2. Know your damages – in particular, are your damages liquidated (fixed) or unliquidated (subject to judicial determination);
  3. Know what you want – if you have a timetable in mind, write it down and have it ready to present to the court;
  4. Know the applicable rules and practice notes – each court has its own unique systems and processes, before you go you should research those and be across your obligations and the appropriate procedures.

Conclusion

If you need any assistance getting ready, or wish to have a litigation lawyer represent you at an upcoming mention, you should engage them as soon as possible prior to the listed date, and ensure you engage a trusted and experienced professional who knows their way around the court room. Contact us at LegalVision and we would be happy to provide you with a fixed fee quote to assist.

Emma Jervis

Ask Emma a Question

If you would like further information on any of the topics mentioned in this article, please get in touch using the form on this page.